Technical Programme Consultant-Part time

TERMS OF REFERENCE

Technical Programme Consultant-Part time

Scope of Work

Under the supervision of the Executive Director the Consultant will be required to undertake the following activities in accordance with the work plan:

  • Contribute to the design and execution of the work plan, which includes capability building training and other activities as required.
  • Contribute to and/or write reports and other documents disseminating UCTRANS’s work and communicating on our activities and results.
  • Conduct monthly capacity building training in resource planning, technical proposal writing and social marketing for UCTRANS affiliates.
  • Develop concept notes and guidelines to support project activities.
  • Provide oversight and feedback to consultants.
  • Coordinate service providers, and support preparation, processing, and administration of consultants and technical services contracts/agreements.
  • Develop and maintain relationships with civil society and other stakeholders in the furtherance of duties.
  • Maintain a time sheet for the period.
  • Supporting and leading other staff members on project to meet their individual targets and objectives.
  • Liaise with the donor regarding project deliverables.
  • Participate in programme technical committees or component team meetings in order to ensure timely implementation progress and a focus on procurement related activities.
  • Prepare monthly programmatic report.
  • Any other duties as required.

QUALIFICATIONS

  • The Consultant(s) should possess:
  • University degree in Social Sciences, Project Management, Public Health or related field;
  • 3-5 years’ experience in a relevant or similar role preferably in an NGO environment with experience in HIV & human rights;
  • Experience and or awareness in working with the Transgender community
  • Knowledge of Human Rights the Human Rights Based Approach as well as stigma and discrimination concepts;
  • Experience of project planning, budgeting, supervision and management including monitoring and evaluation
  • An excellent command of oral and written English;
  • Strong interpersonal skills including flexibility and initiative, team-work essential;
  • Willingness to work with Key Populations.
  • Satisfactory prior experience working with UCTRANS and or our partners

Duration of Contract

The Consultant will be contracted for a period of three months from July-September 2021.

Reporting Relationship

The Facilitator will report directly to the Executive Director at UCTRANS.

Deadline for submission is Friday, July 2, 2021 to be emailed to Alexus D’ Marco, Executive Director, UCTRANS Please send applications to the following email: alexusdmarco@gmail.com

 Please include in the subject line of your email the title of the consultancy you are applying for – “Technical Programme Consultant”.

International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia

WHAT IS MAY 17 ?

The International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia was created in 2004 to draw the attention to the violence and discrimination experienced by lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex people and all other people with diverse sexual orientations, gender identities or expressions, and sex characteristics.

The date of May 17th was specifically chosen to commemorate the World Health Organization’s decision in 1990 to declassify homosexuality as a mental disorder.
The Day represents a major global annual landmark to draw the attention of decision makers, the media, the public, corporations, opinion leaders, local authorities, etc. to the alarming situation faced by people with diverse sexual orientations, gender identities or expressions, and sex characteristics.

Meet our 2021 newly selected Community Liaison Officers

CVC in partnership with UCTRANS will contract the service of Community Liaison Officers
in Bahamas, Haiti, Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago to support UCTRANS and their national
partners in the countries in meaningful engagement of Trans people. The Community Liaison
Officers will be assigned to the local partners in the Bahamas, Haiti, Jamaica and Trinidad &
Tobago and will be responsible for the following:

Duties of the Community Liaison Officer
 Mobilize trans people through national trans organizations
 Assist with the coordination of 2 stakeholder meetings
 Assist in the building of social support networks
 Assist with the coordination of at least 5 support group sessions
 Assist with the facilitation of at least 3 capacity strengthening activities
 Work with national partner to map the impact of COVID-19 and community needs
 Quarterly updates to map Trans-friendly services
 Maintain project records, a database of project partners and stakeholders
 Maintain referral listing and make referrals for services
 Support the maintenance and updating of the national networks social media platforms
 Support with the documentation of human rights violations on the Shared Incident
Database (SID)

Semi Kaefra Alisha Fermond- CLO – Haiti Pronoun – She
Tino Collins – CLO- The Bahamas – Pronoun – He
Xoe Sazzle CLO-Trinidad and Tobago Pronoun – She

Not Pictured: Yolanda N. Constant – Jamaica CLO

Launching Report of Caribbean Trans Survey

We are preparing the launching of the Final Report of Caribbean Trans Survey that was disseminated throughout the Caribbean on International Transgender Day of Visibility which is an annual event occurring on March 31 dedicated to celebrating transgender people and raising awareness of discrimination faced by transgender people worldwide, as well as a celebration of their contributions to society. In most countries in the Caribbean, there is no legal recognition of transgender people’s affirmed gender identity. Without official documents that recognize their gender identity, transgender people are often denied access to basic rights, including the right to health, education, justice, and social welfare. This often results in exclusion from social and civic participation, harassment and stigmatization, limited access to protection, justice and redress as well as inadequate provision of healthcare services. Transgender people are also more susceptible to violence, including physical and sexual violence.

The Caribbean Overview of Legal Gender Identity Recognition

The recognition of the rights of transgender persons continues to warrant
international attention and remains an area that requires targeted advocacy in the
Caribbean. While there are a number of international human rights conventions
which protect all persons regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity,
there is still no single international human rights treaty which specifically protects the
rights of LGBTI persons. Additionally, although countries that are signatories to
binding regional and international treaties are required to respect treaty provisions
and to integrate human rights principles into national legislation, there are still
concerning numbers of punitive national laws and policies that restrict the rights of
trans people throughout the Caribbean. Through restrictive legislation and limited
interpretations of international human rights principles, Caribbean territories either
intentionally or inadvertently do not recognize or affirm the identity of the trans
community throughout the Caribbean.
The lack of a legislative framework for the recognition of trans people’s affirmed
gender identities adversely impacts their ability to access education, health,
employment and privacy and poses serious threats to their personal liberty, human
dignity and personal security. Additionally, the failure to acknowledge trans persons
in their self-identified gender acts as a gateway to broader discrimination. 1
Institutions such as schools, workplaces, governments and healthcare facilities
which are expected to provide services in a non-discriminatory manner are often
guilty of subjecting transgender people to ill-treatment, disrespect, abuse, violence
and the denial of their human dignity.

Legal Gender Identity Recognition
A significant barrier which arises is in relation to the formal processes necessary for
the legal recognition of trans and non-binary identities and how these processes
impact gender markers and identity documents used by trans persons in navigating
spaces. The issue remains complex in nature, as there are instances where
Constitutional and legislative barriers prevent the recognition of trans and non-binary
identities. Similarly, there are cases where governments have taken steps to develop
laws and policies to recognize trans identities but continue to rely on the restrictive
medical model instead of applying the self-determination model. Both scenarios
present a unique set of problems for the trans community and warrant targeted
advocacy and interventions to enact change.
Identity documents are noted as being crucial in solidifying the relationship between
an individual and the State and acts as verification of the classification and identity of
Identification remains an essential requirement for most
significant activities including applying for benefits and social support, finding a job,
opening bank accounts, renting accommodation, accessing health services,
engaging in voting, and travelling across a border. Many forms of official documents
and identification include a biometric photograph and gender markers, often in fields
labelled “sex” with an M or F signifying “male” or “female” respectively. Issues arise
here for trans people as their sex and gender do not align in the way that it does for
cisgender people. As such, photographs or gender markers on official
documentation do not reflect the gender identity of trans people.

Our News

We are in the planning stages of , a  Regional Dialogue on Trans Rights In The Caribbean “Our Path to Identity “ The event is to bring relevant stakeholders, including Trans activists, policymakers and civil society, to discuss on key concerns affecting the Trans communities in The Caribbean .

Working with Haiti’s Trans community under the leadership of Yashia Val of ACIFVH and Dominque of OTHRA , UCTRANS was able to connect the dots and work through some of the issues facing the Trans community through our focus group discussion, and was able to identify a community liaison officer who will assist us on the ground in Haiti. we came up with a set of recommendations to map the way forward and future steps dealing with key policies for a more favorable justice environment, inclusive education system, access to health and labor inclusion amongst others.

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a particularly negative impact on the socio-economic well-being of trans persons in The Caribbean. Thanks to our partners we were able to provide food support, mask and sanitizers, rental assistance , phone credit support to our members . The impact reached 13 Trans organizations in The Caribbean.

The Caribbean Trans survey which was launched in Nov 2020, will share the finding’s in the upcoming weeks as we plan to release our findings on International Day Of Trans Visibility., which is held in March.

UCTRANS conducted its first training for our members on Human Rights of LGBTI persons and gender-based violence, in partnership with UN Jamaica , on 23 -24 November 2020. Two sessions were held in October 2020, we hosted our Mental Health Workshop training for our trans leaders how to care for our community and ourselves This was carried out as part of our activities . 

CARIBBEAN TRANS REPORT

In most countries in the Caribbean, there is no legal recognition of transgender people’s affirmed gender identity. Without official documents that recognize their gender identity, transgender people are often denied access to basic rights, including the right to health, education, justice, and social welfare. This often results in exclusion from social and civic participation, harassment and stigmatization, limited access to protection, justice and redress as well as inadequate provision of healthcare services. Transgender people are also more susceptible to violence, including physical and sexual violence.

The United Caribbean Trans Network (UCTRANS) and OutRight Action International (OutRight) created a survey to research the contextual factors that impact trans people in the Caribbean and their ability to affirm their identity and enjoy their basic human rights. Trans persons from the region participated in the survey. The responses collected deliver much needed and more comprehensive data on the experiences and lived realties of transgender and gender diverse people across the Caribbean region in order to inform and advance advocacy goals. UCTRANS and OutRight will launch our findings on International Trans Day Of Visibility .

COMMUNITY LIAISON OFFICER (PART-TIME)

COMMUNITY LIAISON OFFICER (PART-TIME)

Scope of WorkCVC and UCTRANS would like to contract the service of four (4) Community Liaison Officers (one from each country) to support UCTRANS and their national partner in The Bahamas, Haiti, Jamaica and Trinidad &Tobago in the meaningful engagement of Trans people. The Community Liaison Officers will be assigned to the local partners in The Bahamas, Haiti, Jamaica and Trinidad & Tobago and will be responsible for the following:

● Mobilize trans people through national trans organizations

● Assist with the coordination of 2 stakeholder meetings

● Assist in the building of social support networks

● Assist with the coordination of at least 5 support group sessions

● Assist with the facilitation of at least 3 capacity strengthening activities

● Work with national partner to map the impact of COVID-19 and community needs

● Quarterly updates to map Trans-friendly services

● Maintain project records, a database of project partners and stakeholders

● Maintain referral listing and make referrals for services

● Support the maintenance and updating of the national networks social media platforms

● Support with the documentation of human rights violations on the Shared Incident Database (SID)

http://cvccoalition.org/…/terms-reference-community…